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20121202
20121210
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
was not so much about lgbt rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, t
events of the arab spring or the wisconsin statehouse or who lived through the civil rights movement or the anti-war movement of the '60s and the '70s can doubt their importance. in short, i think, we're going to have to put it all on the line. so allow me to conclude, if i can, by reading to you a few pages from the book. these are the -- this is a section that address how system change can come to america, and they reflect the theory of change that runs throughout the book. the journey to america the possible begins when enough americans have come to three important conclusions. the first is that something is powerfully wrong with our overall political economy. the operating system in which, on which our country now runs. that system is now routinely generating terrible results and is failing us across a broad front. the second conclusion follows from the first, it's the imperative of system change, of building a new political economy that routinely delivers good results for people in place and planet. and the third conclusion is that contrary to what one frequently hears, a better
, and in some states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempts at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can the republican party do about it? big questions. j.c. watts, former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor, or rather put it this way, against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know it backfire
as a voice for civil liberties and civil rights. you have both bush signing it, drafting it, and then it is astonishing that these nativist voices, the fear of the united nations this paranoid sensibility that captures a few votes in the republican party prevent it from passing the senate that is supposed to be a batian of reason. you worked in the obama white house, does it shock you when lindsey graham stands up and votes against this. he's somewhat a respected member of the senate. >> nothing shocks me any more. the republican party has been moving away from disability for some time. when you look at other things that the congress has focused on medicaid, healthcare, the affordable care act, even looking at what's going on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republi
broadly where are we head with civil rights and equality. if the supreme court strikes down the defensive marriage act and strikes down the ban in california on same sex couples marriages it will mean we move to a more equal place. if it reaches a different conclusion we'll see what happens. >> what are the arguments. >> the argument against marriage rights for same sex couples is generally that marriage historically traditionally has been something limited to different sex couples. the supreme court has found in a long time held tradition alone is not enough to justify discrimination. on the other side the real point is marriage when we're talking about marriage recognized by the state as opposed toby a church or synagogue or religious institution, marriage by the state is about a civil right. in those cases government discrimination shouldn't be coming into play. >> do we know at this point -- do we have any sense how the supreme court might line up on this? >> it's hard to say. my view is despite what a lot of people seem to say this is increasingly
that have no beliefs in civil liberties, countries who are terrible on human rights and we say we're going to put you in charge of decisions -- >> that's not what it does. it forces them to live up to standards that we believe in. >> no, it doesn't. where does it say in there the other countries will live up to our standards. >> that's what the treaty does. it seds down standards. >> it does not say -- >> john, happy holidays. bob shrum -- >> giving away all our power. >> sometimes it comes down to how we look at the world. republicans made no secret to keep democrats from voting. is it possible those voter i.d. laws, the photo i.d. laws, actually encouraged african-americans among others to defy the gop and go out and vote. i kneel happened. i have heard that happened. let's hear about it. did it happen? did blacks and others say screw you, you're not going to stop me the from voting. let's find out how it worked. we'll be right back. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are re
that the civil rights of americans all 300 million of us should be taken away and we should be denied the right to own a gun that would be the only way to take it away from jovan belcher is to say no one can own a gun other than military or police. that's an outrageous suggestion. costas ought to be fired. >> larry it's ridiculous we're talking about firing a guy for trying to start a debate about how to control guns in this country. >> i don't want to talk about -- i want to leave the costas situation alone. he said what he said. what i want to talk about igor is the issue of violating the second amendment or greater gun regulation would have stopped this? i mean the question i have -- look, this guy was a big drinker. he suffered concussions. he use ad lot of pain killers. clearly, clearly he had huge mental and physical problems. how would the gun thing have played out if he couldn't have got end it? >> we don't know about this one case but we do know is in cases of domestic abuse you really do see this correlation that if there's a gun in the house the chances of death resulting from domest
by the president. the group of civil rights organizations has filed suit in response. on health care governor brewer has informed the federal government that it's up to them to set up health exchanges for the state's uninsured. states rights surrendered quite conveniently. we're back with anna marie and jonathan. the arizona republic found over 39,000 licenses and even state i.d.s were issued since 2006 to noncitizens who were presented federally issued employment authorizations. so is this another attempt by brewer to initial young immigrants who find themselves in this country, of course, through no fault of their own or does she just enjoy wagging her finger at the president? >> i don't know why that's a binary choice, martin. >> i apologize. that's not a nonsec nonnon sequ. >> i think she knows how to get in the paper. she represents a segment of the republican party that they should be ashamed of. and that they're going to have to deal with at some point. like she cannot be someone who is the future of the gop, let's face it. this is the kind of thinking that alienated so many lahtino vo
of marriage, kenji. when loving -- it's actually post '64 civil rights act. past the voting rights act. these other issues had been taken care of in terms of legislation. but there was still the need to redress the issue of interracial marriage. >> they forget this try cot mi between the social rights. the idea of rights of association as being the last untouchable place where equality norms would penetrate, i think it's really the tact that marriage is always the last thing, right? so as you say, 1967 is lovey versus virginia. employment discrimination, 13 years after brown versus board of education. the supreme court had a marriage case on its bokt in 1956. but kicked it. because it didn't want to touch it with a ten-foot pole so waited for more states to come around. it's also the year that guess who's coming to dinner comes out. there's a cultural legal convergence. we're at that moment for the gay community now. one of the historians in the gay marriage trial, nancy kauts, a historian of marriage, she said one of the emancipated slaves after -- the slaves flocked to get married. s
bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. i do not want to argue civil rights with anybody in japan about the history. i think we are past that. my whole purpose for being here is to honor the dead, to listen to the living, and to see that this does not happen again. >> in washington, he discusses the inspiration for his trip and his meetings with bomb survivors. >> several governors met with president obama tuesday to discuss the soda ash called fiscal cliff and its impact on states and the economy. -- the so-called fiscal clef. members of the national governors' association spoke to reporters but the white house for about 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. i am the chair of the national governors' association, the governor of the telephone, -- of delaware, joined by the governor of oklahoma, the vice chair. and we are also joined by the governors of wisconsin and arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say it was a very good meeting with the president. the issues we face as governors and states are considered as p
the civil rights act and the voting rights act and the americans with disabilities act, is still capable of voting to change things, let alone send a message that could change the world. i ask colleagues to do for the world what they've done for america -- walk down the aisle here and for millions everywhere who cannot walk make a stateme statement. raise your voice and vote for millions who are voiceless in their own lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer:
does hold the hand here. absolutely. charles is right he is trying to provoke a civil war in the republican party. i add it's working. you have tremendous disagreements being shown on the republican side. there are even people i talk to that say the best bet for republicans at this point is to capitulate. to give in on the rates at some level. just allow a whole new situation to develop next year. see what they can make of that. >> john: hold it there. we have a lightning round up next and your choice. locked and loaded. >> always taxes. spend it on a moon base. >> john: you and newt. we'll be right back. >> john: every week, viewers vote for your choice online in the friday lightning round poll. this week, charles krauthammer pick won with 74% of the vote. get to that in a second. first, latest on the supreme court and gay marriage. nina, the supreme court will take up a couple of cases in the spring session. one about proposition 8 in california, defense of marriage act. how do you think the supreme court will rule here? give me a bet. if they uphold the lower court ruli
for joining us. have a great night. see you right back here tomorrow. ♪ lew: good evening, everybody. u.s. foreign policy in the middle east in question at this hour. violence spiring out of control in syria after 20 months of civil unrest and the deaths of at least 40,000 murdered civilians at the hands of their own government. united states and nato agreeing to deploy patriot weapons and to thwart an aso-called by assad. the missile systems to be positioned near the syria. his staff denies that and estimates if they were deploy troops, it requires 75,000 of the troops in a full ground invasion in order to seize the chemical weapon stockpile. fox news confirming they were not ordered to draft the consideration of such a mission. secretary of state clinton is nonetheless talking very tough calling for assad to step down as the obama administration has done for the past 15 months, but refusing, still, to detail which consequences those would be. >> we will explore with like-minded countries what more we can do to bring the conflict to an end, but that will require the assad regime making
the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there is a new generation who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. what we should be focusi
been critical to getting the word out. video like the one posted on-line. this one right here. shows peaceful demonstrations against president bashir aul awes yad that began last year and spiralled into now what is happening. >> activists regularly posting these videos and articles about the civil war that is taking place there. often these are really just only the images we are able to get from the front lines wrush see it there. she is co-founder and managing editor of syrian deeply.org. you're a former correspondent with abc and bloomberg as well. you have seen some of the -- what is taking place there. what do you make of the civil war? >> my heart breaks like the ones in arwa's piece. what we felt we had to do was to step out of the story for a moment and just look at technology, look at what's coming out from user-generated images, from voices of syrians trying to tell their stories and just collect it in one place, so we decided to build syria deeply. it's part news aggregator, part backgrounder and part original reporting. what we felt we needed do was to give people more bac
syndrome. 45 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> oh, my! how ruthlessly absurd! >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall let's rock and roll. there is so much going on that every day presents another exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. get irresistibly clean and fresh carpets in your home with resolve deep clean powder. the moist powder removes three times more dirt than vacuuming alone while neutralizing odors for a clean you can see, smell and really enj
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)